ANTI-RACISM RESOURCES YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT

In 2020, the issues of systemic racism and racial inequality were brought to the forefront of public conversation after the global Black Lives Matter demonstrations. Education is imperative to understanding not only why these protests took place, but what needs to be done to tackle the prejudice faced daily by the Black community.

We have compiled a list of educational resources, both for the public, teachers and employers, as well as providing a host of support resources for POC.

Image 5chw4r7z, via Flickr

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

BOOKS

Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge and counter racism. It is a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary exploration of what it is to be a person of colour in Britain today.

Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few.

Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America--but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to be an Antiracist, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it.

In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion.

Emotionally raw and deeply reflective, Imani Perry issues an unflinching challenge to society to see Black children as deserving of humanity. She admits fear and frustration for her African American sons in a society that is increasingly racist and at times seems irredeemable. However, as a mother, feminist, writer, and intellectual, Perry offers an unfettered expression of love--finding beauty and possibility in life--and she exhorts her children and their peers to find the courage to chart their own paths and find steady footing and inspiration in Black tradition.

In this powerful and provocative memoir, genre-bending essayist and novelist Kiese Laymon explores what the weight of a lifetime of secrets, lies, and deception does to a black body, a black family, and a nation teetering on the brink of moral collapse.

Me and White Supremacy: A 28-Day Challenge to Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor leads readers through a journey of understanding their white privilege and participation in white supremacy, so that they can stop (often unconsciously) inflicting damage on black, indigenous and people of color, and in turn, help other white people do better, too.

From the Civil War to our combustible present, White Rage reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America--now in paperback with a new afterword by the author, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson.

Anger. Fear. Guilt. Denial. Silence. These are the ways in which ordinary white people react when it is pointed out to them that they have done or said something that has - unintentionally - caused racial offence or hurt. After, all, a racist is the worst thing a person can be, right? But these reactions only serve to silence people of colour, who cannot give honest feedback to 'liberal' white people lest they provoke a dangerous emotional reaction.

A story about identity, belonging and displacement, Kill the Black One First is the memoir from Michael Fuller - Britain's first ever black Chief Constable, whose life and career is not only a stark representation of race relations in the UK, but also a unique morality tale of how humanity deals with life's injustices.

"Jarvious Cotton's great-great-grandfather could not vote as a slave. His great-grandfather was beaten to death by the Klu Klux Klan for attempting to vote. His grandfather was prevented from voting by Klan intimidation; his father was barred by poll taxes and literacy tests. Today, Cotton cannot vote because he, like many black men in the United States, has been labeled a felon and is currently on parole."

FILMS

  • I Am Not Your Negro (2016), directed by Raoul Peck

  • Rest in Power: The Trayvon Martin Story (2018), directed by Jenner Furst

  • Fruitvale Station (2013), directed by Ryan Coogler
  • If Beale Street Could Talk (2018), directed by Barry Jenkins
  • The Hate U Give (2018), directed by George Tillman Jr.
  • Hidden Figures (2016), directed by Theodore Melfi
  • Selma (2014), directed by Ava DuVernay
  • 12 Years a Slave (2013), directed by Steve McQueen
  • Just Mercy (2019), directed by Destin Daniel Cretton
  • 13th (2016), directed by Ava DuVernay

TV Shows

  • When They See Us (2019), directed by Ava DuVernay

  • Seven Seconds (2018), directed by Yeena Sud

  • Anthony (2020), directed by Terry McDonough

  • The School That Tried to End Racism (2020), directed by David DeHaney
  • Dear White People (2017), directed by Justin Simien
  • Who Killed Malcolm X?, directed by Rachel Dretzin
  • Phil Bertelsen Time: The Kalief Browder Story, directed by Jenner Furst
  • The Innocence Files (2020), directed by Liz Garbus
  • Orange Is The New Black (2013-2019)
  • Sitting in Limbo (2020), directed by Stella Corradi
  • Small Axe (2020), directed by Steve McQueen
  • Black Is the New Black (2016), directed by Simon Frederick

Podcasts

  • About Race, with Renni Eddo-Lodge
  • 1619, with Nikole Hannah-Jones
  • Good Ancestor, with Layla F. Saad
  • Slay in Your Lane, with Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené
  • Why Aren’t You A Doctor Yet?, with Suhail Patel, Hana Ayoob, Oz Ismail and Alex Lathbridge
  • Code Switch, NPR
  • The Nod, with Brittany Luse and Eric Eddings
  • Yo, Is This Racist? With Andrew Ti and Tawny Newsome
  • No Country For Young Women, with Sadia Azmat and Monty Onanuga
  • Come Through, with Rebecca Carroll

Social Media

Charities and Organisations

 

For Teachers, Parents, and Children

 

Image Getty Images

Support for Students/Graduates in the Creative Fields

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